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InGen Files - Jurassic Park III Male Raptor by Miyess InGen Files - Jurassic Park III Male Raptor by Miyess
Jurassic Park Velociraptor (Male)

Jurassic Park – The InGen Files [link]

Species: Velociraptor mongoliensis

Description: Velociraptor was a pack hunter native to china and Mongolia with a razor-sharp, retractable claw on the second toe. They are intelligent, fast, and extremely vicious ambush predators that can reach speeds of up to 98 km/h out in the open, capable of bringing down animals much larger than themselves. Velociraptors are considered one of the most dangerous dinosaurs bred for the park. Raptors have certainly been the most difficult to handle. They have a decentralized nervous system and are slow bleeders (despite a fast bird-like metabolism) making them very hard to put down. They have caused more employee deaths in Jurassic Park than any other dinosaur. We tagged the most dangerous animals with radio collars that transmitted warning signals. Work men carried little boxes that played a tone when a tagged animal came near, at which point they would flee in terror.
EXTREMELY DANGEROUS

We released the first raptor on April 22, 1985. It wandered back and forth near the wall for four minutes and 22 seconds, before hearing a noise which drew it further off into the brush. The raptor came back towards sundown, it drank nervously, careful of the dangers of the Jurassic water hole. The raptor preened itself, utterly confident of its right to be there, with absolutely no consciousness that it was not the sovereign ruler of this earth. For four months we monitored it while it preyed on herds in the southern forest. We never knew why it grew so large. In the summer of 1988 it began moving north. We released more raptors, and they became a pack. In the jungle, the forest, and the mountain range the three raptor tribes staked out their territories. Uneasy borders were drawn along forest ridges and ponds. A third tribe of raptors chose the mountain for their territory, a leaner tougher breed - quick, living on birds and tiny lizards. By 1987 the first of them had reached full size, and the ecosystem of another era began to assert itself.

Dr. Wu bred a handful of different raptor ‘species’ or morphs in an attempt to select the most suitable for the park on Nublar. We never figured out why they grew so large. Wu suspects Deinonychus DNA. He used bird DNA to fill the gaps in the genome of the regal morph (dubbed so because of the ‘crown’ of quills on the males’ necks). As a result this form is more closely related to the original cretaceous raptor than the tiger morphs. But the board ended up choosing the tiger morph for exhibition on Nublar. It had more reptilian DNA than the other morphs, lacked quills/feathers, and behaved in a vicious manner that park visitors would expect to see.

After the accident at the park, a hurricane wiped out our facility on Site B. Lightning strikes caused power outages and the electric perimeter fences were rendered useless. Large carnivores broke out of their enclosures. There were reports of an explosion in one of the research facilities. We suspected sabotage. People began to panic. As our staff evacuated they tried to salvage as much research data as possible. We sealed off the town save for a few crucial gates (southward to the lowlands, eastwards to the power plant and lab). As we left we vandalized our own locking mechanisms. InGen tolerates no trespasses. Buildings were looted. Technicians and workmen crowded around the docks, fearing they might be left behind when the security ring collapsed. Armed guards stood watch. We had to leave the animals to fend for themselves. And that they did. To our knowledge, all raptor species bred still survive in the wild around our breeding facility on Isla Sorna. Infrared shows they keep to the center of the island. The raptors are extremely territorial.

Our research indicates that despite being slightly smaller than the tiger morph, the regal morph raptors have a somewhat larger head in proportion to body size and are more intelligent. They display greater organization as a pack. They are capable of a broad range of very complex vocalizations, most notable are a deep resonating sound which they seemingly employ during hunting, and a sharp, high-pitched attack scream. The raptors are sexually dimorphic. The males are much more colourful than the females and are easily distinguishable. The males of the regal morph have red patches around their eyes and on their crests. They have keratinous quills along the back of their necks that can be raised if the animal is startled, or to display aggression. Raptor packs are ruled by a dominant female. The queen selects an alpha male and together they form a breeding pair. The alpha is often challenged by younger males for the right to mate. These confrontations often end in death for the loser. The animals breed in communal nests in densely forested areas, usually near a water source. Raptors are known to take part in cooperative breeding (where offspring from a previous mating help in raising their siblings). The non-parental care givers may be other potentially reproducing adults, or reproductively mature but non-reproducing subordinate adults, helping to feed and protect the chicks. Cooperative breeding is generally associated with reduced dispersal from the natal nest or range. It is unclear if this is a characteristic of the original raptors from which our animals were cloned, or whether they have simply chosen this method of reproduction due to limited space and resources on the island. They generally avoid larger predators, but they are very protective of their young, and have been observed to stand their ground in defence of their nesting sites.


*In short this is a far less complicated explanation. V. nublarensis in JP are all female raptors and in TLW we only saw males, and V. sornaensis in JPIII we see both male and female. The skin and eyes of the female raptor from Jurassic Park III are different, but apart from that only the shape of the snout is a bit altered in comparison to the raptors from the first movie.

It is also possible that the Jurassic park raptors are species not found in the fossil record...






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:icondonotuseplz::iconmyartplz:
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:iconalpharaptor6:
alpharaptor6 Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
how does INGEN know what dinosaur they are cloning when they get dna?
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:iconmiyess:
Miyess Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2014
Dr. Wu is asked the same question in the book, and his reply was that they compare the new DNA to the dinosaurs they have already bred. If it is a Parasaurolophus for example, it will be similar to the Edmontosaurs they already have, and they would know to expect some sort of hadrosaur. 

But when they encounter unfamiliar DNA - a new species, they simply grow it and find out what it is. :)


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:iconxmdz:
xmdz Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Actually the Velociraptors from the movies are Deinonychus - in the book it's explained that Deinonychus was "considered one of the Velociraptors", and were referred to under the same genus. The logical assumption is that they are not Velociraptor mongoliensis but "Velociraptor" antirrhopus, with subspecies "nublariensis" and "sornaensis".
Reply
:iconmiyess:
Miyess Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2013

Read the comments between me and DOTB18. Several other people have also made similar comments. I’m completely aware that the JP raptors are not Velociraptor mongoliensis. This will be addressed in the next version of this image.

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:iconxmdz:
xmdz Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Okay!
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:iconmiyess:
Miyess Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013
:)
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:iconpistoletpulemyot:
PistoletPulemyot Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2013
To be fair, the Jurassic Park "raptor" is actually a Deinonychus.
Reply
:iconmiyess:
Miyess Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2013

Read the comments between me and DOTB18. Several other people have also made similar comments. I’m completely aware that the JP raptors are not Velociraptor mongoliensis. This will be addressed in the next version of this image.

Reply
:icondino-mario:
Dino-Mario Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Stunning Raptor!!!
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:iconmiyess:
Miyess Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
Thanks :) I'm actually working on a much more accurate version to be uploaded soon. I hope people will like it.
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